Supervening Orders in the Spiritual Panorama – Part 5 (Although God does nothing, those who approach Him with love and surrender derive everything)

Although God does nothing by way of small miracles, the entire universe which has emanated from Him is the miracle of miracles. The more we ponder on anything in the universe — even the meanest of things — the more miraculous it appears to the human mind. And the universe, which includes an infinite number of such items, giving to each of them an indelible stamp of eternal significance, is an unquestionable miracle because it admits of a thousand questions but offers no answer to the limited human intellect. So, having created this supreme miracle of the universe, God does not bother about performing further minor miracles within his universe, but leaves it to the reign of laws. However, this does not apply to the God-man who may, if he deems it to be fit and necessary, perform numberless miracles in supervention of the normal routine working of the universe, without attaching any especial importance to them.

God does everything and in another sense does nothing. Although God does nothing, those who approach Him with love and surrender derive everything that matters in the spiritual realm, even though He does not do anything in particular towards them. God may be compared to the sandalwood. It continually emits a sweet scent in all directions, though only those who take the trouble to go near it have the benefit of its charming fragrance. But we cannot say that the sandalwood has done anything in particular towards those who approach it, because emanation of its sweet scent is going on all the time and is not specifically directed towards any person or persons. It is available to each and all who care to come within its range. Thus the sandalwood gives in one sense; and in another sense it does not give. Take another example. The river gives water to those who are thirsty in the sense that if thirsty persons approach the river and drink its waters, their thirst is quenched; but the river does nothing either to invite them to itself or to fill them with its waters.

-Beams, p38

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