The Life Eternal – Part 1

 

Besides his explanation of the Fiery Free Life, seven other messages (dictated by Baba in October at Meherazad) were printed in different languages as a booklet, which was distributed among the crowd gathered at each place. ..One of Meher Baba’s prepared messages was entitled Life Eternal:

Without beginning and without end, the caravan of evolutionary creation marches on from the Immeasurable to the Immeasurable. Most persons on the way get caught up in the transient immediate, and evolve by conscious or unconscious reactions to it. Some can detach themselves from the transient immediate. But since their detachment is only intellectual, they enjoy freedom only in the realm of the limited intellect, which now tries to comprehend the past, or anticipate the future, as best as is allowed by the limitations under which it works. They try to shape the present in the light of their knowledge of history, as well as in the light of their insight into the possibilities for the unborn future. But the limited intellect is not competent to grasp quantities which are beginningless as well as endless, with the result that the purely intellectual perspective, even at its best, inevitably remains only partial, sketchy, incomplete and, in a sense, even erroneous.

The intellectual perspective is workable, and even indispensable, for planned action. But in the absence of the deeper wisdom of the heart or the clearer intuition of the spirit, such intellectual perspective gives only relative truth, which bears upon itself the stamp of uncertainty. The so-called planned action of the intellect has behind it many mighty forces which have not even come to the fringe of consciousness; and it also actually leads to many valuable unexpected results which are entirely beyond the range of vision of the so-called planning. In other words, intellectual planning turns out to be a planning mostly in name, containing in it only as much truth as is necessary to justify the players in feeling that they have had a real share in the entire game.

–Lord Meher (First Ed), p3974

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